Saturday, October 26, 2013

Life's Lessons

Over the past week I have noticed quite a few people are blogging or tweeting about feeling depressed or angry. Researchers have labeled the emotions felt at this time of the year as SAD or “seasonal affective disorder.” Apparently, the shortened daylight hours are at the root of these feelings. I don’t suffer from the disorder; I just don’t like it getting dark at 5:30p.m. Of course, the stores pushing Christmas shopping a month before Halloween probably doesn’t help those that are financially stressed. The truth is that everyone has problems to deal with in their lives. No human is exempt from the pain of losing a loved one, being hurt by a friend, being let down by someone they trusted, experiencing failure, or suffering from an illness. It doesn’t matter what our status in life is, whether we are rich and famous or poor and anonymous. Life has a way of handing out joy and suffering on a fairly equal basis. Although, when it is our turn to suffer, it certainly feels like we are given more than our share of grief. The most important thing to remember when life is getting you down is that it will get better. There ARE people who care about you and want you to be okay. The ones that don't care about you are probably the toxic people you should expel from your life before they poison you. Sometimes it's the kindness and caring from strangers that can make all of the difference in someone’s life. Just remember to be nice to others because you have no idea of the struggles they are going through.
I have collected these inspirational words of wisdom from various places over the years. Unfortunately, I haven’t been able to locate or verify an author to credit most of the works although they have appeared on many sites.

Imagine
Imagine there is a bank account that credits your account each morning with $86,400. It carries over no balance from day to day. Every evening the bank deletes whatever part of the balance you failed to use during the day. What would you do? Draw out every cent, of course? Each of us has such a bank, its name is time. Every morning, it credits you 86,400 seconds. Every night it writes off at a lost, whatever of this you failed to invest to a good purpose. It carries over no balance. It allows no over draft. Each day it opens a new account for you. Each night it burns the remains of the day. If you fail to use the day's deposits, the loss is yours. There is no drawing against "tomorrow.” You must live in the present on today's deposits. Invest it so as to get from it the utmost in health, happiness, and health. The clock is running. Make the most of today.”
― Marc Levy, If Only It Were True

The Value of Time
To realize the value of one year:
Ask a student who has failed a final exam.
To realize the value of one month:
Ask a mother who has given birth to a premature baby.
To realize the value of one week:
Ask an editor of a weekly newspaper.
To realize the value of one hour:
Ask the lovers who are waiting to meet.
To realize the value of one minute:
Ask the person who has missed the train, bus or plane.
To realize the value of one second:
Ask a person who has survived an accident.
To realize the value of one millisecond:
Ask the person who has won a silver medal in the Olympics.
Time waits for no one. Treasure every moment you have.
You will treasure it even more when you share it with someone special.
-Author Unknown

Ten Commandments for Worriers
I. Thou shalt not worry...for worry is the most unproductive of all human activities.
II. Thou shalt not be fearful...for most of the things we fear never come to pass.
III. Thou shalt not cross bridges before you come to them...for no one has ever succeeded in accomplishing this feat.
IV. Thou shalt face each problem as it comes...for you can only handle one problem at a time anyway.
V. Thou shalt not take problems to bed with you...for they make very poor bedfellows.
VI. Thou shalt not borrow other people's problems...for they can better care for them than you can.
VII. Thou shalt not try to re-live yesterday for good or ill...it is gone forever.
VIII. Thou shalt be a good listener...for only then do you hear ideas different from your own.
IX. Though shalt not become bogged down with frustration...for 90% of it is rooted in self-pity, which interferes with positive action.
X. Thou shall count thy blessings, never overlooking the small ones...for many small ones add up to one big one.
-Author Unknown

Life’s Lessons
I've learned –
that you cannot make someone love you. All you can do is be someone who can be loved. The rest is up to them.
I've learned-
that no matter how much I care, some people just don't care back.
I've learned-
that it takes years to build up trust, and only seconds to destroy it.
I've learned-
that it's not what you have in your life but who you have in your life that counts.
I've learned-
that you can get by on charm for about fifteen minutes. After that, you'd better know something.
I've learned-
that you shouldn't compare yourself to the best others can do.
I've learned-
that you can do something in an instant that will give you heartache for life.
I've learned-
that it's taking me a long time to become the person I want to be.
I've learned-
that you can keep going long after you can't.
I've learned-
that we are responsible for what we do, no matter how we feel.
I've learned-
that either you control your attitude or it controls you.
I've learned-
that regardless of how hot and steamy a relationship is at first, the passion fades and there had better be something else to take its place.
I've learned-
that heroes are the people who do what has to be done when it needs to be done, regardless of the consequences.
I've learned-
that money is a lousy way of keeping score.
I've learned-
that my best friend and I can do anything or nothing and have the best time.
I've learned-
that sometimes the people you expect to kick you when you're down will be the ones to help you get back up.
I've learned-
that sometimes when I'm angry I have the right to be angry, but that doesn't give me the right to be cruel.
that true friendship continues to grow, even over the longest distance. The same goes for true love.
I've learned-
that just because someone doesn't love you the way you want them to doesn't mean they don't love you with all they have.
I've learned-
that maturity has more to do with what types of experiences you've had and what you've learned from them and less to do with how many birthdays you've celebrated.
I've learned-
that you should never tell a child their dreams are unlikely or outlandish. Few things are more humiliating, and what a tragedy it would be if they believed it.
I've learned-
that your family won't always be there for you. It may seem funny, how people you aren't related to can take care of you and love you and teach you to trust people again. Families aren't always biological.
I've learned-
that no matter how good a friend is, they're going to hurt you every once in a while and you must forgive them for that.
I've learned-
that it isn't always enough to be forgiven by others. Sometimes you are to learn to forgive yourself.
I've learned-
that no matter how bad your heart is broken the world doesn't stop for your grief.
I've learned-
that our background and circumstances may have influenced who we are, but we are responsible for who we become.
I've learned-
that just because two people argue, it doesn't mean they don't love each other and just because they don't argue, it doesn't mean they do.
I've learned-
that we don't have to change friends if we understand that friends change.
I've learned-
that you shouldn't be so eager to find out a secret. It could change your life forever.
I've learned-
that two people can look at the exact same thing and see something totally different.
I've learned-
that no matter how you try to protect your children, they will eventually get hurt and you will hurt in the process.
I've learned-
that your life can be changed in a matter of hours by people who don't even know you.
I've learned-
that even when you think you have no more to give, when a friend cries out to you, you will find the strength to help.
I've learned-
that credentials on the wall do not make you a decent human being.
I've learned-
that the people you care about most in life are taken from you too soon.
I've learned-
that it's hard to determine where to draw the line between being nice and not hurting people's feelings and standing up for what you believe.
-Author Unknown


**Recipe of the Day**

Georgia Pralines
http://tastykitchen.com/recipes/desserts/georgia-pralines/

Ingredients
• 1 cup Chopped Pecans • 1 cup Brown Sugar • 1/3 cups Whipping Cream • 1/4 cups Butter • 1 cup Powdered Sugar • 1 teaspoon Vanilla
Directions
Preheat oven to 350˚
Chop pecans and place on baking sheet or shallow pan.
Bake pecans for 8-10 minutes or until pecans are toasted and fragrant.
In a medium saucepan, bring brown sugar, whipping cream and butter to a boil over medium heat, stirring constantly. Boil for about 1 minute. Remove from heat, and whisk in powdered sugar and vanilla until smooth.
Gently stir in toasted pecans allowing mixture to thicken and cool slightly.
Line the baking sheet with parchment paper.
Drop heaping spoonfuls of mixture onto paper and allow to harden/cool for at least 30 minutes.
Preparation time: 10 minutes * Cook Time: 20 minutes * Servings: 24


**Pet Tip of the Day**
http://www.helpguide.org/life/pets.htm

Pets Are Good For You

How pets can affect mood and health
While most pet owners are clear about the immediate joys that come with sharing their lives with companion animals, many remain unaware of the physical and mental health benefits that can also accompany the pleasure of playing with or snuggling up to a furry friend. It’s only recently that studies have begun to scientifically explore the benefits of the human-animal bond. Studies have found that:
• Pet owners are less likely to suffer from depression than those without pets.
• People with pets have lower blood pressure in stressful situations than those without pets.
• Playing with a pet can elevate levels of serotonin and dopamine, which calm and relax.
• Pet owners have lower triglyceride and cholesterol levels (indicators of heart disease) than those without pets.
• Heart attack patients with pets survive longer than those without.
• Pet owners over age 65 make 30 percent fewer visits to their doctors than those without pets.
• A pet doesn’t have to be a dog or a cat. Even watching fish in an aquarium can help reduce muscle tension and pulse rate.

One of the reasons for these therapeutic effects is that most pets fulfill the basic human need to touch. Even hardened criminals in prison have shown long-term changes in their behavior after interacting with pets, many of them experiencing mutual affection for the first time. Stroking, holding, cuddling, or otherwise touching a loving animal can rapidly calm and soothe us when we’re stressed. The companionship of a pet can also ease loneliness, and some pets are a great stimulus for healthy exercise, which can substantially boost mood.

How pets can help to make healthy lifestyle changes
Adopting healthy lifestyle changes can play an important role in easing symptoms of depression, stress, bipolar disorder, PTSD, and anxiety. Caring for a pet can help with those healthy lifestyle changes by:
• Increasing exercise. Exercise doesn’t have to involve boring repetition at a gym. Taking a dog for a walk, riding a horse, or simply chasing a kitten around are fun ways to fit healthy daily exercise into your schedule.
• Providing companionship. Isolation and loneliness can make disorders such as depression even worse. Caring for a living animal can help make you feel needed and wanted, and take the focus away from your problems. Most pet owners talk to their pets, some even use them to work through their troubles.
• Helping meet new people. Pets can be a great social lubricant for their owners. Dog owners frequently stop and talk to each other on walks or in a dog park. Pet owners also meet new people in pet stores, clubs, and training classes.
• Reducing anxiety. The companionship of a dog can offer comfort, help ease anxiety, and build self-confidence for people anxious about going out into the world.
• Providing sensory stress relief. Touch and movement are two healthy ways to quickly manage stress. This could involve petting a cat or taking a dog for a walk.

Pets and older adults
The key to aging well is to effectively handle life’s major changes, such as retirement, the loss of loved ones, and the physical changes of aging. Pets can play an important role in healthy aging by:
• Helping you find meaning and joy in life. As you age, you’ll lose things that previously occupied your time and gave your life purpose. You may retire from your career or your children may move far away. Caring for a pet can bring pleasure and help boost your morale and optimism. Taking care of an animal can also provide a sense of self-worth.
• Staying connected. Maintaining a social network isn’t always easy as you grow older. Retirement, illness, death, and moves can take away close friends and family members. And making new friends can get harder. Dogs especially are a great way for seniors to spark up conversations and meet new people.
• Boosting vitality. You can overcome many of the physical challenges associated with aging by taking good care of yourself. Pets encourage playfulness, laughter, and exercise, which can help boost your immune system and increase your energy.

Visit your local animal shelter to adopt your new best friend and improve both of your lives!!

1 comment :

  1. I found your great blog through the WLC Blog Follows on the World Literary Cafe! Great to connect!

    ReplyDelete