Thursday, March 19, 2015

How to Translate Southernisms

   I know that many of my blogging friends are coming to Nashville, Tennessee on May 28 thru 30, 2015 for the BlogPaws conference from all over the world.  One of my duties as a BlogPaws Ambassador is to make sure that you are prepared for the adventure.  Since I'm the GRITS (Girl Raised in the South) of the group, I thought I could do my part to familiarize you with some of our 'southernisms' sayings and pronunciations.
Y’all: rhymes with ball ~ (1) Y’all means two or more people (2) All y’all is a larger group of people  Example:  What sessions are y’all taking at the conference?  Are all y’all going to stay at the Sheraton?
“G”: You will notice a lack of the letter “g” at the end of words.  We don’t use it and we aren’t fixin’ to start.
Fixin’: This means that you are preparing to do something, but not actually doing it yet.  Example: I am fixin’ to make a list of the things I need to pack. I'm fixin' to go to sleep.  *We also fix supper, fix our hair & makeup, and get in a fix.
Same things, but different names
Y’all say:                                                  We say:
Shopping carts                                            Buggies
Laundromat                                                Washateria
Crayfish                                                      Crawfish/Mudbugs
Lightening Bugs                                           Fireflies
Dinner                                                        Supper
Hero/Sub Sandwich                                     Po’Boys
Drinking fountains                                       Water fountains
Wallet                                                         Billfold
Heavy rain                                                  Gullywasher
Stubborn                                                    Onery
Pants                                                          Britches                                    
Don’t Be Surprised If…
Your server asks what kind of coke that you want.  Coke is southern for soda, not actually Coca-Cola.
Your tea is sweet and served in a Mason jar.
Perfect strangers strike up a conversation with you in a line. 
Strangers wave and say “Hey y’all!”
Cars pull over for a funeral procession.
*Special Tip: We never tease about our football teams.  Ever.
We say, “Yes ma’am" and "No ma’am”  “Yes Sir and No sir” regardless of age.
You might hear someone say:
We say…                                            We mean…
D’jeet yet?                                         Have you eaten?
I reckon                                             Probably
Sunday go-to-meeting clothes              Dress up
Are those the good scissors?                Did you find the new pair?
Sweatin’ like a sinner on Sunday.         You are nervous.
This ain’t my first rodeo.                      Been there, done that.
Plumb tuckered out                             Tired
I wouldn’t tie my dog to it.                   I don’t really trust it.
Shut the front door!                             Are you kidding?
Gimme some sugar.                             Kiss me!
Quit being ugly.                                   Don’t be mean.
Going to                                              Gonna
*We say, “Bless your heart” a lot.  It can be used sincerely as a sympathetic sentiment.  Example:  “I’m so sorry to hear about the surgery.  Bless his heart.”  It can also be used to try to take the bite out of an insult.  Example:  “She has got the absolute worst taste in clothes.  Bless her heart.” 

   I hope this prepares you for the foreign language of southerners.  You will find that for the most part, we are an extremely friendly group of folks.  It would be terrific to meet all of y’all in Nashville for the BlogPaws conference.  I will be happy to help translate if you are stuck on anything.  If you haven’t ordered your tickets yet, don’t wait!  They are selling fast and with my discount code, you can save 10% ~ BP15-Amb-Melissa-10 
   We are lookin’ forward to seein’ all y’all in 70 days at the Sheraton Music City in Nashville.  That is if the good Lord’s willin’ and the creek don’t rise!


   Barking from the Bayou has a winner in the Long Live Pets campaign with Nature’s Variety and The Best Friends Animal Society.  The lucky person is
Millie and Walter from Bird Brains and Dog Tales 
They won a bag of Nature’s Variety Instinct Rawboost Munchies.  Bentley and Pierre say that y’all will love them!  Congratulations!

  I was excited to see the winner that randomly chosen by Rafflecopter. Millie and Walter’s mom is Cindy and I know her from Blogville.  When I admired our honorable Mayor Doods Murphy and Stanley’s snazzy bandannas, they told me that Cindy’s mom had made them.  She is the owner of the Etsy shop, Cindy’s Thread Craft.  
   Bentley is joining me at the BlogPaws conference and I wanted something special for him to wear.  After discussing my options with Cindy, she designed this gorgeous Barking from the Bayou bandanna.  I absolutely love it.  She is working on a top-secret one for him now.  If you are interested in her bandannas or any of the other cool things that she makes, visit her shop today.  We recommend her whole-heartedly.



  This is our Thoughtless Thursday blog post.  I co-host this fun hop each week with my blogging buddies, Ruckus the Eskie and Love is being owned by a Husky.  Hop along by joining in or clicking to visit these other “Thoughtless” blogs.



25 comments :

  1. A few more from the Lone Star State...
    The porch light's on, but no one's home..... Means kinda crazy, not all there
    She'd make a train take a dirt road..... Means she's ugly
    He's all hat and no cattle............... Means he's full of bull
    Look what the cat dragged in...... Hello!
    Speak of the devil...................... Howdy, we were just talkin' 'bout you!
    Were you raised in a barn? ...... Close the door!! or they're tellin' you you've got bad manners
    Buzzard bait..............................Dead

    ReplyDelete
  2. It's too bad I won't be able to make it to Nashville...I'd fit right in as we spend time every winter in the south! Thanks Melissa!

    ReplyDelete
  3. More from Deep South Louisiana (these don't include sayings from Cajun country as that would be a whole other thing. It is it's own language!):
    Refrigerator.: icebox
    How is your family? : How's your mama and dem? (You can get asked this even if they don't know your family.)
    Porch: veranda
    Ask : ax.
    Asking : axin'
    My grandmother had a time teaching my sisters and I to say ask and not ax! LOL!
    Don't forget to specify unsweet tea if that via what you want! I am Southern, born and raised, but drink unsweet tea with lemon. A paradox!
    Enjoy your time in the South! We have the friendliest people around!





    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Two more I forgot!
      Pecan is not pronounced Pee-can but Puh-cahn.
      Praline is not pronounced Pray-leen but Prah-leen.
      :)

      Delete
    2. Two more I forgot!
      Pecan is not pronounced Pee-can but Puh-cahn.
      Praline is not pronounced Pray-leen but Prah-leen.
      :)

      Delete
  4. More from Deep South Louisiana (these don't include sayings from Cajun country as that would be a whole other thing. It is it's own language!):
    Refrigerator.: icebox
    How is your family? : How's your mama and dem? (You can get asked this even if they don't know your family.)
    Porch: veranda
    Ask : ax.
    Asking : axin'
    My grandmother had a time teaching my sisters and I to say ask and not ax! LOL!
    Don't forget to specify unsweet tea if that via what you want! I am Southern, born and raised, but drink unsweet tea with lemon. A paradox!
    Enjoy your time in the South! We have the friendliest people around!





    ReplyDelete
  5. Oh we loved those particularly gullywasher. Have a tremendous Thursday.
    Best wishes Molly

    ReplyDelete
  6. Bentley, do you have any tips for understanding the southern dog barks and howls? I still have a touch of British accent in my barks and howls, but I would like to fit in. Love your bandana.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I am not sure if we we live in Arkansas is considered southern - we just know the hillbilly talk around here is REALLY hard to understand :)

    ReplyDelete
  8. Haahhaa love it ...we say Plumb tuckered out too and actually most of what you said I got..i also say bless a lot..and yes for nice reasons and also..Oh bless she stuffed it up hahaaha..maybe us down unders are southerners after all ..trust me we have some weird lingo too :) loves Fozziemum xx

    ReplyDelete
  9. Bentley that was a fabulous lesson... my mom laughed like a monkey ... bless her heart :o(
    easy rider

    ReplyDelete
  10. WE say a lot of those Up here North of the Mason Dixon Line Too...... SUPPER is at 5:00... Our mom and dad LOVED Po' Boys when they were in Nawluns. We call UNDERPANTIES.... and Tighty Whities.... DRAWERS our Under Drawers...
    and a Gully Washer is a Darned Hard Rain fur sure...
    Some folks HERE say USE this way... do USE have any Pie left. can USE help us with this... butt they spell USE this way YOUS... What do YOUS want?

    ReplyDelete
  11. We loved all those translations. Woo Hoo! We won your giveaway and you look fantastic in your bandana. Mom is working on your next one and we will keep it a secret. Shhhhhh.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Cute post, Melissa! It might even make a funny instructional video - just sayin'

    ReplyDelete
  13. Thanks for that translation guide. Seems people from all over have a different way of saying the same thing! Love your new bandanna! Cindy does excellent work!

    Your Pals,

    Murphy & Stanley

    ReplyDelete
  14. hahaha wow! It's like a whole other language for sure!!!!
    ღ husky hugz ღ frum our pack at Love is being owned by a husky!

    ReplyDelete
  15. Great post....hope lots of blogville soaks that up....crikey (thats for Charlie) mostly them northern folk so they understands usin's!

    The Mad Scots

    ReplyDelete
  16. Hi Y'all!

    That's a great guide.

    Oh in some areas of the south, y'all is used even when addressin' a single person. You can also tell what part of the south, right down to the region of the state by the softness or harshness of the accent. I grew up sayin' and believin' the way to say p-e-a-c-a-n-s was PEA cans. The rest of the world seemed to say pea CONS. If you're a southerner, you can tell pretty much where in the some on is from by the "dialect". (for the lack of a better word).

    BrownDog's Human

    ReplyDelete
  17. Thanks for the language lesson! The mom is a northern girl so she needed this. :)

    ReplyDelete
  18. I love the way y'all talk! I went to junior college in Pennsylvania and made many friends from different parts of the country, including the south. I picked up expressions from everyone, and when I went home people thought I talked kind of weird! LOL
    Thanks for the great lesson...I might be looking to you for interpretation if I forget anything! :)
    Jan, Wag 'n Woof Pets

    ReplyDelete
  19. Haha, very nice post :-) I've come to learn quite a few southernisms since living in NC ~ I really like "Shut the front door!" and "fixin' ". I actually caught myself using fixin' a few times...usually when getting ready to fix the pups' dinner ;-)

    ReplyDelete
  20. awesome post! I love it! love the bandana too, Bentley is going to be stylin

    ReplyDelete
  21. I don't think we're going to make it to BlogPaws, but thanks for the thesaurus!

    ReplyDelete
  22. I'm so glad you published this handy glossary of terms - many of them are confusing to this native New Yorker. I have never heard of All Y'all, that appears to be a little redundant LOL! In New York they just say "you's" to mean the plural of you. I smack my husband in the head when he says "you's" because it makes him sound dumb! But he's so Onery he still says it! I have never, ever used the term "you's". Ugh!
    Love & Biscuits,
    Dogs Luv Us and We Luv Them

    ReplyDelete